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Nuff Said

mp3: Nuff Said Guitar/Lead Jam Track
wma: Nuff Said Guitar/Lead Jam Track

mp3: Nuff Said Bass Jam Track
wma: Nuff Said Bass Jam Track

mp3: Nuff Said Drums Jam Track
wma: Nuff Said Drums Jam Track

Time/size: 4 mins 55 secs/6.9mb. 130 beats per minute/bpm

Rock funk jam track: This jam track is a rock track with a bit of funk thrown in thanks to the syncopated rhythm that the rhythm guitar, bass guitar and drums are locking into.

Backing track instruments: electric guitar, fretless bass and drums.

Progression: C Major 7, F, CMaj7, F, G, F, G, F, G, G. This is a I-IV-V progression that you can play with just the Major pentatonic scale over the entire progression or you can take it up a level and play the modes shown below over each chord in the progression.

Suggestions: Start off with the C Major pentatonic scale. Advance to the C Major scale over the C Major 7 chord, the F Lydian mode over the F Major chord and the G Mixolydian mode over the G chord.

Nuff Said Chords and Progression

I came up with this jam track after I wrote out the theory for the C Major Scale. You can see on that page that chord shape 4 in the chord-scale relationship section is the C Major 7 (CMaj7 or CM7) that we are using below.

The F Major and G Major chords are standard Major chords shapes with their Root note both on the 5th string.

The CMaj7 chord is note an easy chord shape to play. Use your thumb over the neck to play the 8th fret so you can use the rest of your fingers for the other 4 notes. It's not so much that it's not an easy chord to play, more that it's a hard chord to move to when you go from the F and even more so from the G. Like with everything in music, if you practice changing from the F and G to the CM7 chord slowly, over a few days it will become easier as muscle memory kicks in.

C Major 7

E|--7--
B|--8--
G|--9--
D|--10--
A|--x--
E|--8--

F Major

E|--x--
B|--10--
G|--10--
D|--10--
A|--8--
E|--x--

G Major

E|--x--
B|--12--
G|--12--
D|--12--
A|--10--
E|--x--

Nuff Said Scale Suggestions

1. C Major Pentatonic Scale - 2nd and 5th Positions - Two Octaves

The C Major Pentatonic Scale fits over the entire progression and is a good place to start.

E|---------------------3-5-8-5----------------------------
B|----------------3-5----------8-5------------------------
G|-----------2-5--------------------7-5-------------------
D|------2-5------------------------------7-5--------------
A|-3-5----------------------------------------7-5---------
E|-------------------------------------------------8-(5)-8-

2. C Major Pentatonic Scale - 7th Position - Two Octaves

You should move the pattern around that you are playing rather than just stay in the one place on the guitar neck. Otherwise you'll start playing similar guitar licks repetitively. The more your move around the more sounds and guitar parts you'll come up with.

E|------------------------------8-
B|------------------------8-10---
G|-------------------7-9---------
D|-------------7-10--------------
A|-------7-10--------------------
E|-8-10--------------------------

3. C Major Scale (C Ionian Mode) - 15th Position - Two Octaves

Play the C Major scale over the C Major 7 chord.

If you take the C Major Pentatonic scale from scale 1 above and add the 4th and 7th degrees of the scale to it you get the C Major Scale as show in the guitar tab below.

Use the C Major scale to play over the C Major 7 chord.

E|----------------------------3-5-7-8-7-5------------------------------------
B|---------------------3-5-6---------------8-6-5----------------------------
G|-------------2-4-5------------------------------7-5-4---------------------
D|------2-3-5-------------------------------------------7-5------------------
A|-3-5-------------------------------------------------------8-7-5-----------
E|--------------------------------------------------------------------8-(7)-8-

4. C Major Scale (C Ionian Mode) - 15th Position - Two Octaves

Similarly as we did for scale 3 above, take the C Major Pentatonic scale show in scale 2 and add the 4th and 7th degrees of the scale to it and again we get the C Major Scale.

E|--------------------------------------7-8-
B|--------------------------------8-10-----
G|------------------------7-9-10-----------
D|---------------7--9-10-------------------
A|-------7-8-10----------------------------
E|-8-10-------------------------------------

5. F Lydian Mode - 7th Position - Two Octaves

Play F Lydian mode over the F Major chord.

If you compare F Lydian Mode to the F Major Scale you will see that the difference between the two scales is that the 4th degree of the scale in Lydian mode is raise by a semi-tone (one fret) relative to the 4th in the Major scale.

We can state this for all Lydian modes. i.e. that the 4th degree of the scale in the Lydian mode is a #4 (sharp 4), which is a semi-tone higher to the 4th degree of the Major scale, which is known as a Perfect 4th.

E|--------------------------------------10-12-13-
B|---------------------------10-12-13------------
G|---------------7-9-10-12-----------------------
D|-------7-9-10----------------------------------
A|-8-10-------------------------------------------
E|-------------------------------------------------

6. F Lydian Mode - 12th Position - Two Octaves

Here is the F Lydian mode with the Root note F on the 6th (low E) string at the 13th fret.

E|------------------------------------------------12-13-
B|-------------------------------------12-13-15--------
G|------------------------------12-14-------------------
D|-------------------12-14-15--------------------------
A|--------12-14-15-------------------------------------
E|-13-15------------------------------------------------

7. G Mixolydian Mode - 9th Position - Two Octaves

Play G Mixolydian mode over the G Major chord.

If you compare the Mixolydian mode to the Major scale you will see that there is only one note different between the two scales, similar to how there is only one note different between the Lydian and Major scale. Except instead of the 4th being the note that's different with the Mixolydian mode it's the 7th. In Mixolydian mode the 7th is a b7th (flat 7th, which is one tone, or two frets, below the Root note) where as in the Major scale the 7th degree of the scale is a Major 7th (which is one semi-tone, or one fret, below the Root note).

E|-----------------------------------------12-13-15-
B|------------------------------12-13-15------------
G|------------------7-8-12-14-----------------------
D|--------9-10-12-----------------------------------
A|-10-12--------------------------------------------
E|----------------------------------------------------

8. G Mixolydian Mode - 14th Position - Two Octaves

You should also play this mode shape from 2nd position with the Root note G starting on the 3rd fret which is one Octave below the G at the 15th fret shown for the shape below.

E|----------------------------------------------------15-
B|-----------------------------------------15-17-18----
G|------------------------------14-16-17---------------
D|-------------------14-15-17--------------------------
A|--------14-15-17-------------------------------------
E|-15-17------------------------------------------------

Nuff Said Bass Tab

The bass line to Nuff Said mostly uses the Root and 5th notes of each of the three chords C Major 7, F Major and G Major.

The C to G (Root to 5th) bass part uses the Root note C at the 3rd fret of the A string for the Root note and the 3rd fret of the E string for the 5th. Anytime you are playing a Root note on the 3rd, 2nd or 1st string on the bass you can play the 5th of the chord on same fret one string lower than the Root note, like we are with the opening notes of Nuff Said below.

The Root notes for the F and G chords are being played on the 4th (E) string and the 5th of each chord is being played on the 3rd (A) string. That's another pattern you should know for playing the Root to 5th notes. i.e. the 5th note is located one string higher and two frets up from the Root note on any given string.

Know where the Root and 5th notes are on the fretboard is essential for building bass lines. It's the foundation, especially if you aren't sure what to play when you are jamming with people on a tune that you aren't familiar with.

Start with the Root note of each chord in the progression and then add the 5th. If you do that, the rest of the band will think you have some idea of the tune.

Fake it until you make it baby!

G|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
D|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A|-3-3---3-3---3-3-3---3-3---3-----3------3----3-3----3-3---3-3-3----3-3---3-
E|------3-----3--------3-----3---1-1---1-1----1------3------3--------3------3---

G|------------------------------------------------------------------
D|------------------------------------------------------------------
A|-----3------3-------3------3--------5------5--------3------3----
E|-1-1---1-1---1-1-1---1-1----1-3-3---3-3----3-1-1---1-1----1-

G|------------------------------------
D|------------------------------------
A|-----5------5--------3------3------
E|-3-3---3-3----3-1-1---1-1----3-3-

Nuff Said Drum Chart

Put some funk into the beat.

Web page with drum instruction: Nuff Said Drum Chart

Download: Nuff Said Drum Chart

Nuff Said Drum Instruction

Jam on!

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